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Posted on: May 2, 2018

Town of Webster Scam Alert!

Webster residents are receiving spam robocalls that are using a caller ID with "TOWN OF WEBSTER" and a number beginning with 872.

These calls are using a recorded message to advertise medical alert devices and prompt recipients to press a number to be connected to an operator. 

Please note that these calls are not originating from the Town of Webster.


Below are some helpful tips from the Webster Police Dept. for dealing with Robocalls.

- REGISTER YOUR NUMBER: Register with the free National Do Not Call Registry if you haven’t already at donotcall.gov or 1-888-382-1222.

- DON’T PICK UP: When you get an unsolicited call from a number you don’t recognize, let it go to voicemail. Many spammers won’t leave a message.

- NEVER SAY ‘YES’: If you do answer the suspicious call, or respond to a voice message from an unsolicited caller, do not answer “yes” or offer any personal information during the conversation. The sooner you hang up after sensing a call is sketchy, there’s less of a chance you’ll let something slip.

- THE IRS, SOCIAL SECURITY AND THE DMV AREN’T CALLING YOU: Hang up if the caller claims to be from the IRS, Social Security, the DMV or a similar agency, as government officials will only ever reach out to you through the mail, unless you call them first. And many spam callers claim to be debt collectors for debit and credit cards, student loan offices, banks and retailers. Hang up and contact your bank, credit card company or loan office directly to see if they actually need something.

- CHECK FOR CHARGES: If you fear you’ve let something slip to a scammer, check your banking, credit card, phone and cable statements for unfamiliar charges. Call the billing company and dispute anything that you didn’t knowingly authorize. Demand proof if they claim you were recorded approving the charge. And you can also contact the Federal Trade Commission to dispute charges.  https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/0219-disputing-credit-card-charges

- SEE WHAT YOUR PROVIDER PROVIDES: Look into what spam and robocall controls your phone carrier provides to block unwanted and anonymous calls, like AT&T’s Call Protect, or T-Mobile’s Scam ID and Scam Block.

- THERE’S AN APP FOR THAT: Robocall-blocking apps are also popping up. Hiya, free for iOS and Android, flags potential scam calls, adds context to where unknown numbers might be to coming from and lets you report scam numbers in the app. Nomorobo for $1.99 a month on iOS works similarly to Hiya. Truecaller is a free iOS and Android app that alerts you to fraudulent calls before you pick up. And the free Should I Answer? app for Android crowd sources nuisance numbers, so users can warn each other about the worst unwanted call offenders.